Information Security

To stay out of the headlines, take cybersecurity seriously

You’ve probably heard about the Equifax data breach. And you’ve probably noticed an uptick in the conversation about cybersecurity. There’s a really simple reason why stories like this are happening more and more frequently; we simply aren’t taking cybersecurity seriously.

Ignorance of cybersecurity is no excuse

Target. Yahoo. eBay. Netflix. JP Morgan Chase. The U.S. Office of Personnel Management. Sony. Ashley Madison. The Democratic National Committee. LinkedIn. Home Depot.

What do all of those companies have in common? They all have been the victim of cybersecurity breaches.

Imagine how attractive a law firm that specializes in medical malpractice or personal injury is to a hacker. Or what about a defense firm with terabytes of business emails, trade secrets and financial information?

Cybersecurity Fundamentals

On July 19th, we held our July Advantage Lunch live from Edgewood Country Club where it was simulcast to Shepherdstown and via webinar. (If you haven’t heard about our Advantage Lunch, learn more at In addition to the pictures and video below, be sure to check out our Facebook photo album!

Learning more about the government's rigorous cyber security standards

Two Advantage Technology professionals recently returned from the preeminent event for training, education and workforce development for protecting the country’s infrastructure from cyber threats.

The National Cyber Summit took place in early June in Huntsville, Ala. The annual event attracts commercial and defense companies as well as healthcare, automotive and energy industries and academia. It was sponsored by Information Systems Security Association.

Randy Ross and Rob Dixon from Advantage Technology were on hand to learn and to network with other providers.

What is Phishing?

In our last blog, we discussed the broad term hacking, which is using a computer system to gain unauthorized access into another computer or network.

Phishing, on the other hand, has a more specific meaning. The term is a play on the word fishing because cybercriminals are dangling a fake “lure” hoping system users will bite by giving out private information. That information can be anything such as credit card numbers, account numbers, passwords, user names and more. As with most online scams, the goal is to steal money.